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  • December 09, 2020
    All You Need to Know About Brain Aneurysms
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  • December 08, 2020
    Seventeen genetic abnormalities that cause brain aneurysms
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  • August 04, 2020
    After a brain aneurysm rupture, can a delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) be stopped?
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  • February 01, 2020
    The Silent Killer That Took My Dad’s Life
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  • January 23, 2020
    Can Artificial Intelligence be used to Diagnose Brain Aneurysms?
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  • January 10, 2020
    2018 Research Grant Recipient developing biomaterial for treatment of aneurysms
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  • November 07, 2019
    UB receives funding to develop brain aneurysm screening
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  • October 30, 2019
    Meet Research Grant Recipient: Vincent Tutino
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  • October 29, 2019
    Can aspirin decrease the rate of intracranial aneurysm growth?
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  • October 24, 2019
    Meet Research Grant Recipient: Adam Khan
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In My Area

Support groups
  • AdventHealth Brain Aneurysm Support Group

    Winter Park, FL

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  • Baltimore Brain Aneurysm Foundation Support Group

    Lutherville-Timonium, MD

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  • Bay Area Aneurysm and Vascular Malformation Support Group

    San Francisco, CA

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  • December 08, 2020
  • BAF
  • Genetics
  • Research

Seventeen genetic abnormalities that cause brain aneurysms

Nearly three percent of the world’s population is at risk of developing an intracranial aneurysm, a localized dilation of a blood vessel forming a fragile pocket. Rupture of this aneurysm results in extremely severe, and, in one-third of cases, fatal haemorrhage. In the framework of the International Stroke Genetics Consortium, a team led by the University of Geneva (UNIGE), the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG) and the University of Utrecht is studying the genetic determinants of aneurysms in order to better understand the different forms of the disease and to assess individual risk.

Through the examination of the genome of more than 10,000 people suffering from aneurysms compared to that of 300,000 healthy volunteers, 17 genetic abnormalities have been identified that are notably involved in the functioning of the vascular endothelium, the inner lining of blood vessels. In addition, the scientists discovered a potential link between these genetic markers and anti-epileptic drugs, making it possible to consider the use of certain drugs in the management of the disease.

Read more here

Université de Genève. “Seventeen genetic abnormalities that cause brain aneurysms.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 December 2020.



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